North West Anglesey Cottages

BEACHCOMBERS

BUTTERCUP

DAISY MOO

OYSTER CATCHER

THE STABLE LOFT

BIG MOO

BWTHYN ANGOR

GLAN GORS FELIN

ERW RHYS

THE CROW’S NEST

BORTHWEN BACH

BWTHYN DERWEN

LAUNDRY LOFT

HIGHFIELD

THE OLD DAIRY

BORTHWEN FARMHOUSE

CABLE COTTAGE

MENAI COTTAGE

GAMEKEEPER’S

Escape to the wild sweeping North-west coast of Anglesey with stunning coastal scenery, coves, caves and rock pools. The Anglesey Coastal Path is so close you can access this most majestic of shorelines and set off on a journey of discovery. It is not called the Wild West for nothing!

Journey along the western shores to visit Church Bay, where the pebbled beach, named after the nearby Llanrhuddlad Church stretches for miles. Right by the Church Bay beach is the Lobster Pot, a wonderful seafood restaurant known for years and visited by generations new and old. A lovely little Wavecrest cafe serves the best fish pie and cream scones. Porth Trwyn (known as Borthwen Beach locally) is a quiet haven with sand at low tide and rock pools.

Fydlyn beach sits sheltered by the rocky islets of Ynys y Fydlyn. This beach is quite hard to find but a good walk on the Anglesey Coastal Path will reward you with views to sea and the Skerries lighthouse. A walk around the coastal offers rich wildlife and a pioneering aviator! This Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is part owned by the National Trust it is simply stunning and a must for all to visit. Keep a watch out for grey seals on Craig yr Iwrch, and porpoises and dolphins too. Cemlyn Nature Reserve is a wild retreat for walkers and bird watchers. Finish your tour of this coastline at Cemaes Bay, the most northerly village in Wales with a great little seaside village feel and plenty of cafes and little places to find treats.

Further along towards Holyhead is Porth Tywyn Mawr (Sandy beach) stretches for miles with sand dunes to scramble along and sparkling water for water sports enthusiasts to enjoy. Start exploring at South Stack, where our most westerly lighthouse warns ships of the rugged coastline. Perched up high with cliff tops views is Elin’s Tower – a wonderful RSPB hideaway that allows all who visit to learn about our visiting seabirds that flock to the cliffs to nest and feast on fish galore. Grab a pair of binoculars and ask questions as the volunteers are so knowledgeable and child friendly. Scamper up the hill and look down upon the lighthouse – photographers will be in heaven as the scenery is spectacular.

A step away from the shores of Anglesey are inland gems. Visit Llynnon Mill, built in 1775, the only working windmill in Wales and still producing stoneground wholemeal flour using organic wheat! Pop to see the two roundhouses on site to have an insight into the life of Iron Age farmers who lived and farmed here over 3000 years ago. After exploring, step back to this century and settle down for a cup of tea and a slice of homemade cake in the tearooms. Llyn Alaw is another must – Anglesey’s largest lake was built in the 1960s as a source of drinking water for the northern half of Anglesey. Woodland and scrub line its shores and provide the perfect habitat for a wonderful array of wildlife. Paths around the lake allow you to explore but be warned they are not circular ! Fishermen bring your rods – there is great trout fishing to be had with permits in place.

Rugged shores or historic sites, the North Western side of Anglesey holds much to be admired. Explore away as there is so much to be found and many places that are so quiet you wonder whether anyone else has discovered them !